Jonny Haynes

Nov 20

#movember #day19 #mogress #tashtag

#movember #day19 #mogress #tashtag

Nov 14

We’ve bought a nice baby mobile from Mamas and Papas today. Jess’ brother @jackspartan and his girlfriend bought him a nice cuddly teddy. He’s so soft.

We’ve bought a nice baby mobile from Mamas and Papas today. Jess’ brother @jackspartan and his girlfriend bought him a nice cuddly teddy. He’s so soft.

Nov 13

IMG_1454

IMG_1454

Nov 10

Ordered this Friday from @amazon and it arrived today. It’s a @justmobile Xtand Go. The unboxing experience is superb. Just like buying an Apple product. The device looks awesome and is easy to fit and use. I would highly recommend it.

Ordered this Friday from @amazon and it arrived today. It’s a @justmobile Xtand Go. The unboxing experience is superb. Just like buying an Apple product. The device looks awesome and is easy to fit and use. I would highly recommend it.

Oct 26

Some quick thoughts on LESS, SASS and other ‘CSS Extenders’

I got into a discussion with lukewh on Twitter about Less.css after I asked people’s thoughts on it.

Having done quite a bit of research over the last few days into Less.css and other ‘CSS extenders’ as Luke called them, I thought I’d add to the discussion …

I, like some of my colleagues we’re amazed and apprehensive about Less all at the same time.

We’re big advocates of OOCSS and have been using that with a combination of grids on projects for the last six months. I’ve always liked the power with OOCSS but never liked how cluttered the HTML can become by adding in lots of extra classes. 

I think a combination of OOCSS and Less.css would work best for me (if that’s best for the company I’m not sure as we develop in Windows). I’ll try to explain why. 

If we have a text element (<p>) that needs to be red in colour, 16 pixels high and with a black background. In OOCSS we’d create classes for all of these styles so they could be used again. Like so:

.red { color: #ff000; } 
.font-16 { font-size: 16px; }
.black-fill { background-color: #000; }

And we’d add them to the HTML like so:

<p class=”red font-16 black-fill”>Text</p>

Ah, you might be thinking, 3 classes, that’s not so bad. But we could add a border-radius, a border, padding, margin etc.

That could end up being lots of classes.

Don’t get me wrong. The speed at which a site can be thrown together is immense. And it’s easy to edit the site further down the line. But to me, it’s not really accomplishing the main thing CSS is supposed to provide.

Separation of content and layout.

And that’s what has always irked me with OOCSS. But I think Less.css can help me with that.

I could achieve the same thing like so:

.red { color: #ff000; } 
.font-16 { font-size: 16px; }
.black-fill { background-color: #000; }

This is the cool Less.css part.

p { 
.red
.font-16
.black-fill

}

With the HTML being:

<p>Text</p>

Obviously in the real world this may be in a div with an id or something like that so I’d still be able to target it. But this is more like what CSS and HTML should be.

This is Less.css in it’s most basic form. It can do a whole load more of crazy things, but that’s for you to find out.

Now,

Back to Luke’s post.

He doesn’t like the fact that you have to rely on a javascript compiler that runs in the browser. I agree, I think this would be rubbish for anything but a small site that gets no visitors.

However, there’s a whole host of other ways to compile the code. The one I’m probably going to use. Being a Mac user is the Less app. But you can also compile it on the server before it even gets to the client side.

Even today, Smashing Magazine tweeted a link to this. A parser built as an Adobe Air app, so even you Window’s guys can compile the code easily. It also allows you to set up a folder so that when the files in it are updated it compiles them on the fly. I like the idea of that. 

One of the bigger tasks I thought I’d have to undertake would be the rewriting of all of my initial project files. Like a reset.css, typography.css and grid.css. But I found this at lunch, showing that it can be easily done and the benefits of it.

I’m sold and I hope this goes some way to convincing you. Let me know on Twitter.

Luke’s orignal post is featured below.

lukewh:

I recently started a conversation with Jonny Haynes on Twitter, responding to his question:

Asking again, not many replies yesterday. What are your thoughts on Less.css?http://lesscss.org/ #less #css #development #web #ask

Original Tweet

And 140 characters isn’t enough for me to say what I think, so here it is.

When I first discovered these extensions I thought the future was here. Dynamic CSS with variables and mixins etc. etc. - very useful for the big project I was working on at the time. However I was disappointed when I realised how much you had to do to *compile* these dynamic files into CSS before deploying. I didn’t, and don’t, understand why I had to add an extra layer of complication and computing to something that IMO can be solved by writing better* CSS?

Many argue these languages (let’s call them) make your development quicker, I don’t disagree with them, I can see the benefit. I however didn’t think the setting up of, and maintaining of, the compilers worth the time.

When Jonny diverted me to the LESS page I was pleasantly surprised to see a client-side compiler in the form of Javascript, on first thoughts (and response to Jonny) I thought this was a step forward, but on hindsight I think it’s *almost* a step backwards for two reasons:

  1. Reliance on Javascript
  2. Javascript file that’s probably bigger to load then the CSS file would be if you just wrote it all in boring old CSS

Plus I like to be able to jump onto any PC, open a text editor and do some mad CSS. There’s probably a lot more to say on the subject, and there’s probably a lot of holes in my rationale, but for now I’ll keep typing my CSS out like it’s 2009… Having new-age fun with a vintage feel! Maybe I just need to see the light?

* I use the term better loosely. 

ps. I feel the same with Javascript….

(Source: lukewh)

Unofficial NASA Mission Patches by James White

imjustcreative:

Media_httpimjustcreat_riqjc via imjustcreative.co.uk

(Source: thelogosmith)

sheffieldcyclechic:

feb0101 on Flickr.
Sheffield Council loves bollards

sheffieldcyclechic:

feb0101 on Flickr.

Sheffield Council loves bollards

May 06

Responsive Web Design -

The first and the greatest - and article from ALA on responsive web desgin and using media quiries

May 04

“How can I help you today, ma’am?” -

clientsfromhell:

Me: “How can I help you today, ma’am?”

Client: “Is e-mail internet”?

Me: “I beg your pardon?”

Client: “Is e-mail on the internet? I have no internet, can I still read my e-mail?”

Me: “Well yes, you must be able to get online to view your e-mail.”

Client: “Oh, dear. I can’t see my…

“Make the uterus more artsy”

clientsfromhell:

Revision notes for a medical practice’s logo:

“Make the uterus more artsy”

Jan 18

simurai:

:toggle - A while ago I worked on a project where I needed just a simple toggle button to show and hide some content. The obvious way would be to use JavaScript for that functionality. But then I thought: Is it possible to create a toggle button with only HTML and CSS3?
See the result: Live Demo.

simurai:

:toggle - A while ago I worked on a project where I needed just a simple toggle button to show and hide some content. The obvious way would be to use JavaScript for that functionality. But then I thought: Is it possible to create a toggle button with only HTML and CSS3?

See the result: Live Demo.

(via simurai)

Badge of Shame -

cameronmoll:

Jeremy Keith’s thoughts on the W3C HTML5 logo unveiling:

What we have here is a deliberate attempt to further blur the lines between separate technologies that have already become intertwingled in media reports.

Don’t get me wrong; I don’t mind if marketers and journalists use HTML5 to mean everything under the sun, but I expect working web developers to be able to keep specs separate in their mind.

Jan 17

[video]

Jan 13

“Several of these logos are just too creative for me.” — (via clientsfromhell)